[Bite-sized News] The Korean Art of Chicken-Frying

Apologies for the radio silence! Just got back from Hong Kong (with a TON of blogworthy material. And excess weight) and work’s been keeping my nose to the grindstone.

I promise to have something on this space by the weekend. In the meantime, click here for a great article by Julia Moskin of The New York Times on the differences between American style fried chicken and how the Koreans like theirs. Old article, but one that’s timeless.

An excerpt:

For crunch, American-style fried chicken relies on a thick, well-seasoned crust, often made even thicker by soaking the chicken pieces beforehand in buttermilk. When that crust is nubbly and evenly browned, and the chicken meat is cooked through, the chicken is sublime. But too often, the flesh is still raw when the crust is cooked, or the skin never cooks all the way through, leaving a flabby layer of skin between the meat and the crust.

Korean-style fried chicken is radically different, reflecting an Asian frying technique that renders out the fat in the skin, transforming it into a thin, crackly and almost transparent crust. (Chinese cooks call this “paper fried chicken.”) The chicken is unseasoned, barely dredged in very fine flour and then dipped into a thin batter before going into the fryer. The oil temperature is a relatively low 350 degrees, and the chicken is cooked in two separate stages.

Mm hmm… and nowhere do you have a better example of quintessentially Korean fried chicken than at Gyeyolsa Chicken. Man I miss Seoul so badly.

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